Halloween Listening: Archival tales of ghosts, witches, & haints

Happy Halloween.

Today’s Halloween edition of The Lost Child is mostly made up of southern haunting and supernatural tales, with stories of ghosts, witches, zombies, and haints. A few spooky tunes for the season are scattered in also, along the way.

In case you missed it, or want to hear it again or share it with a friend, you can stream the whole episode anytime here

and I’ve got an extra 90 minutes of Halloween-themed music available for streaming here.

Many of the stories in today’s show come from the online archives of the Digital Library of Appalachia (Blue Ridge Institute and Museum, Ferrum College), the Library of Congress, and the Association for Cultural Equity: all excellent resources, and all searchable and streamable anywhere, for free.

Even better, perhaps, than the ghostly specifics of the stories themselves, the true highlight of today’s episode may be its gathering of warm and wonderful accents. I hope you’ll give it a listen.

Here’s the playlist and source info:

  1. Sandy Shelor: Giant cat ghost
    Recorded by Kip Lornell, Carroll County, Virginia, 1970s
    Digital Library of Appalachia
  1. Cora Jackson: Ghost story, ten-foot woman
    Recorded by Kip Lornell, Fairfax County, Virginia, 1977
    Digital Library of Appalachia
  1. The Phantom Five: Graveyard
    Skull Records, 1964
  1. Ed Harris: Haunted house
    Recorded by Kip Lornell, Chilhowie, Virginia, 1977.
    Digital Library of Appalachia 
  1. 11 and 12 year old girls: Conversation about ghosts
    Meadville, Mississippi, c. 1972-3
    Library of Congress 
  1. Bessie Jones: Ghost story about a haunted church
    Recorded by Alan Lomax, Greenwich Village, 1961
    Bessie Jones lived in St. Simon Island, Georgia. 
    Association for Cultural Equity
  1. Aunt Jenny Wilson: Witch Story #1
    Recorded by Fred Coon, Peach Creek, West Virginia, c. 1960s
    from Aunt Jenny Wilson: Recordings from the collection of Fred Coon, Field Recorders’ Collective, 2007.
  1. Kip Tyler: She’s My Witch
    Ebb Records, 1958
  1. Margarie Quinlin: Lamb of God story
    Recorded by Kip Lornell, Patrick Henry Community College, Martinsville, Virginia, 1985
    Digital Library of Appalachia 
  1. Burl Hammons: Turkey in the Straw (story)
    Recorded by Carl Fleishchauer and Alan Jabbour, Stillwell, West Virginia, 1972. From The Hammons Family: The Traditions of a West Virginia Family and their Friends, Rounder Records, 1998.
  1. Quincy Higgins: Hant tale and witch story
    Recorded by Patrick Mullen, Sparta, North Carolina, 1978
    Library of Congress
  1. Herbert Fulk: Witch stories
    Recorded by Patrick Mullen and Blanton Owen, Toast, North Carolina, 1978
    Library of Congress
  1. Lilia Huddie: Broom test for Liz Deavers
    Recorded by Roddy Moore, Wytheville, Virginia, 1970s
    Digital Library of Appalachia 
  1. Lou Rawls: Season of the Witch
    from The Way it Was — The Way it Is, Capitol Records, 1969
  1. Texas Gladden: Ghost story of Civil War soldiers and a haunted house
    Recorded by Alan Lomax, Manhattan, New York, 1946. Texas Gladden was from Saltville, Virginia. 
    Association for Cultural Equity
  1. Eartha White: A ghost story
    Recorded by Robert Harrison Cook, Jacksonville, Florida, 1940
    Library of Congress
  1. Lightnin’ Hopkins: Black Ghost Blues
    from Soul Blues, Prestige Records, 1964
  1. Zora Neale Hurston: Haitian zombies
    Mary Margaret McBride Show, 1943
  1. Bessie Jones: Ghost story about a haunted wood
    Recorded by Alan Lomax, Greenwich Village, 1961. Bessie Jones lived on St. Simons Island, Georgia.
    Association for Cultural Equity
  1. Lee Morse and her Blue Grass Boys: ‘Tain’t No Sin (To Dance Around in Your Bones)
    Columbia Records, 1930
  1. The Phantom Five: Graveyard
    Skull Records, 1964
  1. Kathryn Tucker Windham: Don’t be afraid of ghosts
    Alabama Folk Sampler Stage, City Stages, Birmingham, Alabama, 1998. Kathryn Tucker Windham was from Selma, Alabama.
    Alabama Folklife Collection, Alabama Department of Archives and History

Thanks for tuning in.

Medieval monsters by Sebastian Münster, 16th century.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s